ALTERNATIVE SPRING BREAK AT THE VCU RICE CENTER

By Arthur V. Evans

© 2010, J. Barton

Last week, I met a group of very dedicated and enthusiastic students from the Virginia Commonwealth University and Virginia Wesleyan College at the VCU Rice Center in Charles City County. They had spent the last several days participating in various activities as part of this year’s Alternative Spring Break. Sponsored by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Alternative Spring Break provides students with an opportunity to explore and give to their community by providing a week’s worth of environmental and conservation projects, such as planting trees, tending gardens, tidying  up parks and wildlife refuges, and stream cleanups. At the Rice Center, some of the students would have the opportunity to help me with my insect survey.

© 2010, J. Barton

After an impromptu presentation about my survey and some of the methods used to trap insects, my team of volunteers was ready to get started. They grabbed tools and traps and set out for the first trap site. Working like a well-oiled machine and with minimal direction, they quickly established two sets of Malaise, Lindgren, and pit fall traps in less than two hours.

Malaise trap. © 2010, A.V. Evans

What is a Malaise trap you ask? It’s like a tent with its walls on the inside and is specifically designed to capture flying insects, day or night. Upon hitting the internal nylon panels, most insects will eventually work their way up into a collecting container partly filled with alcohol. Malaise traps are usually used to catch flies, bees, and wasps, but other kinds of insects are captured, too. They are typically placed along roads, trails, streams, or forest edges. Up to 1,000 insects a day may be captured in a good site.

Lindgren funnel trap. © 2010, A.V. Evans

Lindgren funnel traps are designed to attract and capture wood-boring beetles and other insects that alight on tree trunks. They consist of a rain and debris guard with a dozen black plastic funnels suspended directly underneath. Attached to the bottom funnel is a specimen receptacle. Each trap is fitted with chemical lures that simulate the odors given off by dead and dying trees. Insects attempting to land on the trap fall down the funnels and into the receptacle at the bottom. Foresters use Lindgren funnel traps to monitor pest insects in stands of managed timber, especially bark beetles.

Pit fall traps connected by drift fences of metal flashing capture small crawling animals,

Pit fall traps. © 2010, A.V. Evans

especially insects and other arthropods. At the end of each drift fence is a single pit fall trap consisting of two 16-ounce plastic drink cups nested in one another and sunk so that the tops are flush with the soil surface. The inner cup is partly filled with environmentally “friendly” antifreeze (propylene glycol). Each cup is covered with 1/2” mesh and flashing to keep out both vertebrates and rain.

© 2010, A.V. Evans

Thank you so very much to all the students who joined me on that wonderful day. Not only did you help get the job done, you also inspired me with your camaraderie, energy, and sense of purpose.

© 2010, A.V. Evans

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2 Responses to “ALTERNATIVE SPRING BREAK AT THE VCU RICE CENTER”

  1. have you heard of a bug that would sting like abee and live under the skin for 6 months then come out. it has no legs no head about the size and shape of rice black on one side and white on the other. the Dr. saide it was a tick. I dont think so. Do you have any idea?

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